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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

3 edition of Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career found in the catalog.

Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career

demographic and socioeconomic factors and the value of children

by Rodolfo A. Bulatao

  • 388 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by East-West Center in Honolulu, Hawaii .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Family size -- Social aspects.,
  • Family size -- Economic aspects.,
  • Fertility, Human.,
  • Fertility, Human -- Decision making -- Mathematical models.

  • Edition Notes

    Bibliography: p. 145-152.

    StatementRodolfo A. Bulatao and James T. Fawcett.
    SeriesPapers of the East-West Population Institute,, no. 60-F (June 1983)., Current studies on the value of children, Papers of the East-West Population Institute ;, no. 60-F., Papers of the East-West Population Institute.
    ContributionsFawcett, James T., 1935-
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsHQ760 .B842 1983
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 152 p. :
    Number of Pages152
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3169523M
    ISBN 100866380434
    LC Control Number83011639

    18 Controlling for changes in these situational factors, therefore, should be important in prospective assessments of unintended childbearing. In the case of fertility decisions, a change in marital status is likely to be one of the most important situational changes that may influence childbearing intentions. In trying to understand the influence of economic factors on fertility, a number of analysts have focused on the Depression especially. A glance at fertility rates over time indicates clearly that the rates declined during the Great Depression, suggesting that economic stress may decrease childbearing especially.

      1. Introduction. Most previous studies on fertility behavior have adopted an individualistic perspective, considering the childbearing decision as a function of individual characteristics while largely ignoring social influence from relevant others such as one's partner, relatives, and friends.   Unlike the TPB the Traits-Desires-Intentions (TDI) models proposed by Miller and Pasta, , Miller and Pasta, , Miller and Pasta, was developed specifically in relation to fertility. In the TDI, the link between fertility desires and fertility intentions is explicitly outlined ().The starting point is an individual's underlying motivation towards childbearing.

      To expand current knowledge, the primary aims of the present study were to examine fertility knowledge and intentions in men and women not trying to conceive and to ascertain whether these varied across gender and contextual factors and to examine which sources of information are used to gather information about fertility. Introduction. Across the developed world people are postponing parenthood, and in several Western European countries the mean age of first-time mothers is now around 28–30 years while fathers, on average, are around three years older ().Studies have shown that the majority of childless women and men desire to become parents in the future (), and most express a wish to have two or three.


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Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career by Rodolfo A. Bulatao Download PDF EPUB FB2

Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career. Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center, (OCoLC) Document Type: Book: All Authors /. Author(s): Bulatao,Rodolfo A, Title(s): Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career: demographic and socioeconomic factors and the value of children/ Rodolfo A.

Bulatao and James T. Fawcett. Country of Publication: United States Publisher: Honolulu, Hawaii: East-West Center, Description: ix, p. Anecdotal evidence of high-earning women (with incomes over $,) has suggested that women who place high importance on their careers and work many hours during their prime childbearing years have often been unable to also meet their fertility intentions (Hewlett ).

Though prior research has investigated the effects of work hours (i.e., working full- or part-time as compared Cited by: Influences on childbearing intentions across the fertility career: demographic and socioeconomic factors and the value of children by Rodolfo A Bulatao (Book) 5 editions published in in English and held by 79 WorldCat member libraries worldwide.

By employing multinominal logistical regression models, factors influencing postponement, abandonment and realisation of childbearing intentions are uncovered. Our results indicate that in all four countries age, partnership status and education influence the realisation of fertility intentions in comparable ways; however, the specific effects of some of these factors by: 3.

A study on fertility intentions in Bulgaria revealed that perceived behavioural control had an effect on the decision to have a second child and subjective norms were the most influential on the intentions to become a parent (Billari et al.

relationship between the socio-psychological factors and childbearing intentions. Social pressure emerges as the most important aspect in fertility decision-making. Keywords: Pregnancy intentions, Unintended childbearing, Unintended pregnancy, Maternal behaviors, Infant health Introduction The unintended pregnancy rate in the United States has remained relatively unchanged for the past three decades, at 54 per 1, women ages 15–44 in both and (Henshaw ; Finer and Zolna ).

Time I fertility intentions are strong and persistent predictors of fertility, even after controlling for background and life course variables. The effect is greater when the intentions are held with greater certainty. In contrast, the expected timing of births has a much more modest and short-term effect.

Demographic factors, and especially age, have been shown to influence the stability of fertility intentions across an individual’s life course. Fertility preferences seem to decline with increasing age (Gray et al.

; Hayford ; Heiland et al. ; Ní Bhrolcháin et al. There is an extensive body of literature on the determinants of fertility including fertility intentions and it is well established that individual intentions are significant predictors of fertility.

() The demographic and public health literature is also rich with evidence on the effect of fertility preferences on contraceptive dynamics. Findings revealed that the division of work clearly influences childbearing. division of work are very similar across countries (detailed results are available Fertility intentions also.

relationship between the socio-psychological factors and childbearing intentions. Social pressure emerges as the most important aspect in fertility decision-making. among childless individuals and one-child parents, and positive attitudes towards.

childbearing are a strong component in planning for a child. While fertility rates are generally low in Europe, fertility intentions remain close to replacement level.

Inacross the 27 countries of the European Union, women in young adulthood (age 15 to 24) intended to have, on average, children (Testa ).This suggests that couples frequently have fewer children than they intended to have, resulting in an aggregate gap between intentions.

Given the biologically risky nature of women's decision to postpone childbearing the current study examined the extent to which anticipated action regret (regret associated with performing the behaviour) and anticipated inaction regret (regret associated with failing to perform the behaviour) may influence a young woman's intentions to delay childbearing.

The hypothesised effect of increased education on fertility intentions is ambiguous since it depends on the magnitude of a number of counteracting forces. Much economic literature has focused on the labour market channels through which education impacts on fertility, emphasising in particular, substitution and income effects.

They include: age, conjugal status, number of children already born, but also partners’ employment status (notably employment security), dwelling occupancy status (owner or tenant), partners’ level of education, distance from the respondent’s mother’s home (who may provide help with childcare), religious practice (which influences fertility intentions).

fertility intentions can b e expected to change over reproductive careers, an d these change s can be expecte d not onl y in res ponse to e xternal, social and econom ic. Factors generally associated with increased fertility include the intention to have children, very high gender equality, religiosity, inter-generational transmission of values, marriage and war, maternal and social support, rural residence, pro family government programs, low IQ.

and increased agriculture. Classic demographic theories conceptualize desired family size as a fixed goal that guides fertility intentions over the childbearing years.

While fertility intentions feed into actual behaviour, there is a gap between ideals and intentions, on the one hand, and actual childbearing, on the other hand. In Finland, this gap is among the highest in Europe, mostly due to the proportions of childless people who would have wished for around two children (Goldstein et al.

). It is increasingly acknowledged that an equal sharing of domestic labour in a household influences women’s childbearing behavior in a positive way. Despite the growing literature on this association, there is little research exploring this phenomenon in the Middle Eastern setting.

Using intensive interviews with women (n = 32), I examine how the division of domestic labour is connected .We contribute to the current knowledge base in two important ways.

We consider the intention-behavior link for women and men with both negative and positive fertility intentions, rather than.